The latest:

  • Quebec’s daily count for confirmed infections rises to 205 new cases.
  • Ontario reports 158 new COVID-19 cases, 11th day of triple digits.

Britain has recorded its highest daily number of new coronavirus cases since May, with 2,988 new infections announced on Sunday.

Like other European countries, the U.K. is seeing the number of infections rise as society reopens after lockdown. 

Some of the increase can be accounted for by expanded testing, which is identifying people who have mild or no symptoms. The number of hospital admissions and deaths has so far not shown a corresponding rise. Two new deaths were reported Sunday.

The increased number of cases comes as British schoolchildren return to class, a milestone in the resumption of normal life.

A person wearing a protective face mask is seen in London on Sunday. The U.K. is experiencing a rise in coronavirus infections that is possibly explained by expanded testing. (Henry Nicholls/Reuters)

Greek health authorities also announced 144 new cases of the coronavirus Sunday — 24 from international arrivals, as well as four deaths.The total number of cases is 11,544, with 284 deaths. While the median age of those who got sick is 39. among those who have died, the median age is 78.

Although the latest numbers are well off the recent highs, when the number of new daily cases reached nearly 300, authorities are stepping up controls and fines for people not wearing masks in closed spaces or not keeping social distancing.

What’s happening with coronavirus in Canada

As of 1:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, Canada had 131,858 confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases. Provinces and territories listed 116,311 of those as recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 9,183.

Quebec reported 205 new cases on Sunday, for a total of 63,497. That’s the highest daily count since June 6 and up from Saturday’s total of 175, which was the province’s highest daily increase in cases since late July.

Ontario reported an additional 158 cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, marking the 11th day of daily case counts in triple digits. The majority of the cases continue to be concentrated in Toronto, Peel Region, Ottawa, and York Region, which reported 49, 44, 21, and 16 cases respectively.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, noted that 631 new cases of COVID-19 were reported across the country on Saturday, for an average of 525 cases a day in the last week, a noticeable uptick from earlier in the summer. That average rose to 545 on Sunday.

“In terms of age, the trend of increased disease activity among younger individuals has continued for many weeks, with people under 40 years of age accounting for over 62 per cent of cases in the latest data reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada,” Tam said in a statement released Sunday.

Here’s what’s happening around the world

According to the tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, the global total of confirmed coronavirus cases is now more than 26.9 million. More than 880,000 people have died while 17.9 million have recovered.

In the Americas, Mexico has recorded 122,765 deaths more than would be expected during the pandemic up to August, the health ministry said in a report on excess mortality rates, suggesting the country’s true coronavirus toll could be much higher than reported. Mexico has recorded 67,326 confirmed coronavirus deaths, the world’s fourth-highest death toll.

In Asia, India saw another record surge of 90,632 cases in the past 24 hours as infections spread to smaller cities and rural parts of the country. According to the Health Ministry, India’s caseload reached 4,113,811, slightly short of Brazil’s more than 4.12 million confirmed infections. Brazil is the second worst-hit country after the United States with more than 6.2 million cases.

In Africa, the continent has more than 1.2 million confirmed infections, with the majority of them — more than 635,000 — in South Africa.

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