Category ز ویک

Drug makers reportedly to pledge they won’t cut corners on coronavirus vaccine

President Trump’s new postmaster general, Louis DeJoy, has been in hot water lately. First, the North Carolina businessman and Trump donor proposed sweeping policy changes within the USPS in the crucial months leading up to a presidential election that is expected to see unprecedented levels of mail-in voting. He suspended those changes after reports of delays and management problems within the postal service, but Democrats say he has yet to provide the House Oversight Committee with documents related to his proposed changes. He also apparently doesn’t know how much it costs to mail a postcard.

That’s all bad, but it’s not illegal. The latest scandal, unearthed by The Washington Post, regards DeJoy’s financial contributions to GOP politicians...

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10 things you need to know today: September 5, 2020

President Trump denied reporting from The Atlantic that said he repeatedly called U.S. military personnel captured or killed in battle “losers” and “suckers,” but multiple outlets corroborated the report on Friday, including Fox News. The Associated Press and The Washington Post confirmed the comments, saying Trump begged out of a trip to pay respects to U.S. World War I dead at Aisne-Marne American Cemetery outside Paris because “it’s filled with losers” and “suckers.” Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin reports that while planning a July 4th military parade, Trump was opposed to including “wounded guys,” saying, “that’s not a good look” and “Americans don’t like that...

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Former FBI agent says Russia held back in 2016 election interference

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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Chest X-rays could provide ‘rapid, cost-effective’ COVID-19 diagnosis when ‘adequate testing is lacking’

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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Jeopardy! is finally returning after a coronavirus break — with Ken Jennings in a big new role

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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White House reportedly eyeing Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie to replace Mark Esper as defense secretary

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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Fox News journalist Trump wants fired over reports on his alleged U.S. troops insults: ‘My sources are unimpeachable’

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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VA secretary defends Trump amid damning reports that he insulted U.S. service members

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

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The week’s good news: September 3, 2020

When high school runner Axel Aleman saw Levi LaGrange injure himself during a 5K race last weekend, he stopped to help, knowing that while it meant he wouldn’t finish with one of his better times, it was the right thing to do. Aleman and LaGrange were running in the Southwestern Small School Invitational in Shelbyville, Indiana. A half mile from the finish line, LaGrange felt his ankle roll. Aleman was behind him, and saw he was in pain. Other runners were flying past, but Aleman stopped to offer assistance. “I knew I had to do something,” Aleman told the Indianapolis Star. He put his hand on LaGrange’s back for support, and helped him the rest of the way, following him across the finish line. “He has amazing character,” LaGrange said...

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Economist highlights difference between ‘ability’ and ‘willingness’ to reopen economy amid pandemic

Hundreds of thousands of students from across the world have descended on America’s university campuses for the start of the academic year, and college towns have become the “new front in America’s pandemic,” The New York Times reports. Despite efforts to curtail the coronavirus’ spread, cases have spiked in about 100 college towns, according to a Times analysis. While “there has been no uptick in deaths in college communities,” the concern is that students — many of whom are asymptomatic — will spread the disease to older, more vulnerable people.

For all the lofty rhetoric about academic duty of care, one big reason colleges vowed to reopen this fall is because they need the money...

Read More