There’s a large swath of Americans who have said they wouldn’t get a coronavirus vaccine if one was made widely available at a low cost, although the reasons vary.

President Trump’s supporters are among those who said they would refuse — just 38 percent of likely Trump voters said they would get a vaccine in an August CNN poll, which some analysts suggested was the result of a growing distrust in science. But Trump’s critics have also expressed wariness about a rushed vaccine, alleging the White House wants the Food and Drug Administration to approve one without taking all the proper precautions before the November election.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), the Democratic vice presidential nominee, didn’t exactly dispel those concerns in an interview with CNN’s Dana Bash that’s set to air Sunday. Bash asked the senator if she would receive a vaccine approved before the election, to which Harris responded by saying she “would not trust Donald Trump and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he’s talking about.”

Harris added that she doesn’t think scientists and public health experts will have the last word on a vaccine (for what it’s worth, Moncef Slaoui, the chief adviser for the Trump administration’s vaccine mission, said there has been no interference from the White House and said he would resign if there ever was.) “If past is prologue than they will not, they’ll be muzzled, they’ll be suppressed, they will be sidelined,” she said. “Because he’s looking at an election coming up in less than 60 days and he’s grasping to get whatever he can to pretend he has been a leader on this issue when he is not.” Read more at CNN. Tim O’Donnell

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